Friday, May 11, 2018

The Memory Box

"The Memory Box" by Eve Lesko Natiello has a super-interesting premise at the outset, with another cool premise in the epilogue. For that reason alone, it's worth a read, even if the main character gets on your nerves from time to time (this is probably a personal dis-preference of mine not to read about flaky or weak heroines, so don't let me put you off).

Blurb:
What would you do if you Googled yourself and discovered something shocking? A group of privileged suburban moms amuse themselves by Googling everyone in town, digging up dirt to fuel thorny gossip. Caroline Thompson, devoted mother of two, sticks to the moral high ground and attempts to avoid these women. She’s relieved to hear her name appears only three times, citing her philanthropy. Despite being grateful that she has nothing to hide, a delayed pang of insecurity prods Caroline to Google her maiden name—which none of the others know.

The hits cascade like a tsunami. Caroline’s terrified by what she reads. An obituary for her sister, JD? That’s absurd. With every click, the revelations grow more alarming. They can’t be right. She’d know. Caroline is hurled into a state of paranoia—upending her blissful family life—desperate to prove these allegations false before someone discovers they’re true.






Friday, March 30, 2018

Let Me Lie - Clare Mackintosh

"Let Me Lie" by Clare Mackintosh was a page-turner. I really cared about the characters and stayed up way past stupid-o'clock to finish it. Can't wait for the next book by this author.

Blurb:

The police say it was suicide.
Anna says it was murder.
They're both wrong.
One year ago, Caroline Johnson chose to end her life brutally: a shocking suicide planned to match that of her husband just months before. Their daughter, Anna, has struggled to come to terms with their loss ever since.
Now with a young baby of her own, Anna misses her mother more than ever and starts to ask questions about her parents' deaths. But by digging up the past, is she putting her future in danger? Sometimes it's safer to let things lie . . .




Tuesday, March 20, 2018

The Hate U Give

People will tell you that "The Hate U Give" by Angie Thomas is about race issues. Heck, the author herself will tell you that "The Hate U Give" is about race issues. And yet here I am to tell you that  "The Hate U Give" is about so much more than race.

I'm not trying to make light of the very weighty issue, which the book handles beautifully, BTW. It's just that to me the themes that came forward were family, love, the bond between father and daughter, the definition of friendship, the duty you have to people around you.

I loved the author's voice, I loved the characters, I loved the message.


Monday, March 05, 2018

Neighborly

"Neighborly" by Ellie Monago is a true suburban thriller. Somebody said that the setting is like "Pleasantville" but already in full colour - and I can't find a better way of expressing it. Add intrigue and crime, and you have "Neighborly".

Some themes are truly disturbing, but they're handled in a way that doesn't scar.

Blurb:
Kat and Doug felt like Aurora Village was the perfect community. Minutes from the city, affluent without pretension, low crime with a friendly vibe—it’s everything Kat never had, and that she’s determined to provide for her infant daughter. Snagging a nice bungalow in this exclusive enclave was worth all the sacrifice. But everything changes overnight when Kat finds a scrawled note outside their front door.
That wasn’t very neighborly of you.
As increasingly sinister and frighteningly personal notes arrive, each one stabs deeper into the heart of Kat’s insecurities, paranoia, and most troubling, her past. When the neighbors who seemed so perfect reveal their open secret, the menace moves beyond mean notes. Someone’s raising the stakes.
As suspicious as she is of every smiling face and as terrified as she’s become of being found out, Kat is still unprepared for the sharp turn that lies just ahead of her on Bayberry Lane.


Thursday, February 22, 2018

Emma in the Night

Emma in the Night by Wendy Walker can be described as "intelligent suspense". There is a lot of psychoanalysis of the characters, and it adds to the plot rather than slow it down. I ended up liking even the not-so-likeable protagonists, and I was sorry when I ran out of pages to read.

Blurb:
One night three years ago, the Tanner sisters disappeared: fifteen-year-old Cass and seventeen-year-old Emma. Three years later, Cass returns, without her sister Emma. Her story is one of kidnapping and betrayal, of a mysterious island where the two were held. But to forensic psychiatrist Dr. Abby Winter, something doesn't add up. Looking deep within this dysfunctional family Dr. Winter uncovers a life where boundaries were violated and a narcissistic parent held sway. And where one sister's return might just be the beginning of the crime. 


Sunday, February 18, 2018

Look for me

"Look for me" by Lisa Gardner continues the story of detective D.D. Warren and survivor Flora Dane. Read it for the thriller part, or for the excellent commentary on social services and what it means to have a perfect family.

Blurb:
The home of a family of five is now a crime scene: four of them savagely murdered, one—a sixteen-year-old girl—missing. Was she lucky to have escaped? Or is her absence evidence of something sinister? Detective D. D. Warren is on the case—but so is survivor-turned-avenger Flora Dane. Seeking different types of justice, they must make sense of the clues left behind by a young woman who, whether as victim or suspect, is silently pleading, Look for me.