Saturday, July 16, 2016

The Widow by Fiona Barton

The Widow by Fiona Barton is a page turner. I don't usually pick up books where children go missing, and - warning - this is one of those, but I started reading before I realised.

Please don't expect "Gone girl" or "Girl on the train". I'm not sure why the publisher decided to slot this book with the other two - not indeed what "Gone girl" has in common with "Girl on the train". They're all British. They all have female protagonists. They all have black covers. Therein end the similarities.

The blurb, for those who need one:

When the police started asking questions, Jean Taylor turned into a different woman. One who enabled her and her husband to carry on, when more bad things began to happen...
 
But that woman’s husband died last week. And Jean doesn’t have to be her anymore.
 
There’s a lot Jean hasn’t said over the years about the crime her husband was suspected of committing. She was too busy being the perfect wife, standing by her man while living with the accusing glares and the anonymous harassment. 
 
Now there’s no reason to stay quiet. There are people who want to hear her story. They want to know what it was like living with that man. She can tell them that there were secrets. There always are in a marriage. 
 
The truth—that’s all anyone wants. But the one lesson Jean has learned in the last few years is that she can make people believe anything…


Saturday, July 09, 2016

Scorpion - TV series

Scorpion - to watch or not to watch? I like stories about genius misfits such as Sherlock and The Big Bang Theory. Scorpion's dialogue isn't as clever as Sherlock's, and it's not as charming as The Big Bang Theory. At least the plot seems less formulaic than The Mentalist, and it's not as cringy as the IT Crowd.

3 episodes down. Decisions, decisions.


Tuesday, July 05, 2016

Person of Interest - Season 5

Person of Interest has had its ups and downs. More ups and the downs weren't deep valleys, more like lower hills. Season 5 is going strong. My favourite so far is Episode 4, titled 6,741.


Thursday, June 23, 2016

We were liars

"We were liars" by E. Lockheart is the kind of book that sends me to online book club chats because I can't wait for my next face-to-face bookclub meeting. It's the kind of book that stays with me for weeks. And, despite the sad themes, it's the type of book I'm glad to have read,

I'm not saying anything more on purpose. But here's the blurb:

A beautiful and distinguished family.
A private island.
A brilliant, damaged girl; a passionate, political boy.
A group of four friends—the Liars—whose friendship turns destructive.
A revolution. An accident. A secret.
Lies upon lies.
True love.
The truth.


Saturday, June 11, 2016

Blindspot Season 1

*** SPOILERS ***

So I've finished watching season 1.

Overall feeling: addictive
Consistency: good writing, though towards the last quarter the plots seemed a bit too unbelievable (e.g., shoot a lot of innocent students because you hate one person?)
Favourite moment: the anniversary treasure hunt
Least favourite moment: David getting killed
Biggest question: why not relate the information directly to the FBI, without all the puzzles?


Saturday, June 04, 2016

Clouds in My Coffee

"Clouds in my Coffee" is the third book in the Country Club Mystery series by Julie Mulhern. I like the protagonist, the plot is fast-moving enough to make the reader want to swallow the book in a sing sitting, while the light style of writing fits well with the cosy murder mystery genre.




Blurb: When Ellison Russell is nearly killed at a benefactors’ party, she brushes the incident aside as an unhappy accident. But when her house is fire-bombed, she’s shot at, and the person sitting next to her at a gala is poisoned, she must face facts. Someone wants her dead. But why? And can Ellison find the killer before he strikes again? 

Add in an estranged sister, a visiting aunt with a shocking secret, and a handsome detective staying in her guesthouse, and Ellison might need more than cream in her coffee. 

Monday, May 30, 2016

Black-eyed Susans

Black-eyed Susans by Julia Heaberlin is an intelligent thriller, written in language that's rich and beautiful and very, very readable.

The premise is as simple as it is brilliant: a survivor of a brutal serial killer is wondering whether the right man is on death row for the crimes. The themes range from motherhood, through the morality of the death penalty to the fallibility of eye-witness statements.

I appreciate that the author chose not to dwell on the victim's ordeal at the hands of the serial killer. Some things are best left to the imagination. The thriller is all the more thrilling this way.