Monday, May 01, 2017

One Perfect Lie

If you love thrillers... but violence not so much, try One Perfect Lie by Lisa Scottoline. It's a page-turner that will warm your heart.



Sunday, April 16, 2017

Designated survivor

"Designated survivor" is a TV series that's not only about conspiracy or USA politics. It's also about human decency. A bit of an oxymoron, decency and politics in one paragraph, but there you have it. Extremely watchable.


Monday, April 10, 2017

I see you

"I see you" by Clare Macintosh is a page-turner. Call it a who-dun-it or a psychological thriller... this is a fast-paced nail-biter about real characters in an almost unreal (and yet chillingly plausible) situation.

(I found the author's much-acclaimed debut too melancholy-grey to read beyond the first few chapters - and that's despite being aware of the twist. This book was not depressing like the first, and it did have an OMG twist nonetheless.)


Blurb:

You do the same thing every day.

You know exactly where you're going.

You're not alone.

When Zoe Walker sees her photo in the classifieds section of a London newspaper, she is determined to find out why it's there. There's no explanation: just a website, a grainy image and a phone number. She takes it home to her family, who are convinced it's just someone who looks like Zoe. But the next day the advert shows a photo of a different woman, and another the day after that.

Is it a mistake? A coincidence? Or is someone keeping track of every move they make . . .



The Memory Watcher

The Memory Watcher by Minka Kent is an intriguing psychological thriller with a twist I didn't see coming. I loved the message of the book "not everything you see online is real" - because, no matter how we know it intellectually, we keep falling for FaceMyth time and time again.

Blurb:
When Autumn Carpenter stumbles upon the social media account of the family who adopted her infant daughter years ago, she finds herself instantly drawn into their picture-perfect existence.

From behind a computer screen, Autumn watches Grace's every memory, from birthdays to holidays to bedtime snuggles. But what starts as an innocent fascination soon spirals into an addictive obsession that comes to a screeching halt the day the McMullen family closes their Instaface account without so much as a warning.

Frantic and desperate to reconnect with her daughter, Autumn applies for a nanny position with the McMullens, manipulating herself into Grace's life under false pretences. And it's only then that Autumn discovers pictures lie, the perfect family doesn't exist, and beautiful people? They have the ugliest secrets.




Monday, March 27, 2017

I Liked My Life by Abby Fabiaschi


I Liked My Life by Abby Fabiaschi is a novel that you want to describe as “beautiful” and “poignant”, but those words have been used to often, and to reflect this book’s originality and depth, you ultimately need much fresher and more significant adjectives.

 

It’s a book about how to live your life, how to cope with loss, and how to not hurt those you love. It’s a book about marriage, teenagers, and death. It’s about what comes after and how what came before shapes our destiny.

 

It’s a book that deserves our attention.


Ready Player One


If you haven't read "Ready player one" by Ernest Cline yet, try it. You will love it if:

  • You remember the 80s fondly.
  • You liked video games.
  • You watched 80s movies.
  • You played text adventure games.
  • You’re into SF and VR.

Premise: The 80s have been recreated in virtual reality, and now a treasure hunt is on: for a fortune in money, but also for the ownership of the virtual reality and for the chance to save it from a greedy corporation hell-bent on changing the setting forever. The plot is one gigantic video game / treasure hunt / puzzle.

 

Young Adult level, a bit too much swearing for young young-adults. A romance subplot. Because the plot is a virtual reality game, any deux ex machina devices should be forgiven. J


Monday, March 06, 2017

When I was Invisible

"When I was invisible" by Dorothy Koomson is a beautiful book about an ugly topic. Don't let the backstory tragedy stop you, though. This novel will make you think about many issues and on many levels.

In 1988, two eight-year-old girls with almost identical names and the same love of ballet meet for the first time. They seem destined to be best friends forever and to become professional dancers. Years later, however, they have both been dealt so many cruel blows that they walk away from each other into very different futures – one enters a convent, the other becomes a minor celebrity. Will these new, ‘invisible’ lives be the ones they were meant to live, or will they only find that kind of salvation when they are reunited twenty years later?